Business as usual

More than ten years of ERA (Excellence of Research in Australia) data gives a clear picture of the trajectory of creative arts research in academe … from 2006 to 2013, the total number of research outputs in field of research (FoR) 19 Creative Arts and Writing increased by 36%. This makes the 14% increase for the period 2011 to 2016 look far less like a cause for optimism, especially considering the national average discipline growth of 17%. The full-time equivalent number of staff producing research outputs in FoR19 … has shown a marginal increase of 4%. This ends the good news, such as it is.

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DDCA thanks Professor Su Baker AM for her leadership

By Professor Clive Barstow

As incoming president of the DDCA, I would like to pay my utmost respects to Professor Su Baker AM for her outstanding leadership and advocacy for the arts over many years in her capacity as president of the DDCA. Su has gained tremendous respect across so many arts and higher education communities both in Australia and overseas and has been a major influence on national arts policy here in Australia through her ongoing professional relationships with government and private sector organisations.

I think I speak on behalf of all academics, students and arts graduates across Australia in acknowledging Su’s tireless contribution to make life richer for all of us, and in influencing our policy makers about the important role the arts play in the forming of our cultural and national identity.

Su established the DDCA in 2013 with the vision of bringing together our various peak bodies so that the arts can speak as one voice, and a voice with unity and authority. Under Su’s direction the DDCA has achieved so much in its brief history, and it has achieved this with strong moral and ethical principles that are key to our understanding of humanity, a core value as a result of Su’s leadership that is often taken for granted.

During Su’s Presidency, the DDCA has represented the views of the tertiary creative arts sector in a range of fora, including submissions to federal government consultations on research policy, funding, training and the engagement and impact agenda and established NiTRO as a vehicle to support discussion and debate within the sector.

Following Su is like accepting a role after Nelson Mandela or Mahatma Ghandi have stepped down once they have realised there is more to life than running a committee! While I could never emulate Su’s achievements, I rest easy in the knowledge that the DDCA has a wonderful committee of movers and shakers, which will include Su as a contributing member for a few more years to come. The collective insight and leadership of the DDCA will continue its mission to work closely with our colleagues in all the arts disciplines and to advocate for a strong and robust cultural policy that will benefit the nation into the future.

I am very proud to be given the opportunity to take on the presidency of the DDCA and very thankful to Su for her strong leadership and guidance over many years.

Professor Clive Barstow
President The Australian Council of Deans & Directors of Creative Arts
Executive Dean Arts & Humanities Edith Cowan University

DDCA welcomes Professor Clive Barstow as its new President

18 March 2019 marks quite a momentous date for DDCA. At the DDCA Board meeting held on that date, Professor Su Baker  AM formally tendered her resignation as DDCA President, handing over to DDCA Vice President Professor Clive Barstow to continue the good work.

IMG_welcome-to-clive.jpg

As someone who has been involved with DDCA from its early days (and even prior to this during discussion about the need for DDCA), it will seem strange not to have Su’s energy and insight at the helm. Of course Su would be the first to acknowledge that DDCA is very much a group enterprise by ‘DDCA active’ colleagues from across the sector and, particularly, current and former DDCA board members.  It is therefore fitting that the DDCA Presidency now passes to Clive, who has been part of the DDCA journey since its beginning.

Clive is Executive Dean of Arts & Humanities at Edith Cowan University, as well as Honorary Professor of Art at the University of Shanghai Science & Technology China, Honorary Professor of Design at Guangdong Baiyun University China and global faculty member of Fairleigh Dickinson University in New Jersey USA.

He has an extensive history of teaching and researching in creative arts. Prior to moving to Australia in 1992, he taught at Middlesex University in London and the Kent Institute of Art and Design. He trained under Eduardo Paolozzi at the University of the Arts London (Chelsea School of Art) and holds a PhD from Griffith University Australia.

Clive is also practicing artist and writer. His exhibition profile includes forty years of international exhibitions, artist residencies and publications in Europe, America, Asia and Australia. His work is held in a number of collections, including the Musse National d'Art Modern Pompidou Centre Paris and the British Council USA. Clive is President of the newly formed Sino-Australian Artists Association. and President of the newly formed Sino-Australian Artists Association. He is also Director of the Open Bite Australia Print Workshop, which encourages the development of printmaking within a number of local indigenous communities.

His recent exhibitions include “Tomorrow is History” at the Turner Galleries Perth WA, “Giving Yesterday A Tomorrow” at the Hu Jiang Gallery Shanghai China, “Cultural Pruning” at the Meou Art Gallery M50 Art Space Shanghai and recent publications include “Encountering the Third Space:  a study of identity and hybridity through trans cultural artistic practice in Australia and China” Oxford University UK. In 2005 Clive was awarded the distinguished teaching award by the Australian Council for University Art & Design Schools, for his contribution to art and design education in Australia.

Clive has been a regular contributor to NiTRO since its beginning and we look forward to working closely with him as DDCA President over the coming years.

Australian Research Council Engagement and Impact Assessment results revealed

The ARC has now released results for the first Engagement and Impact assessment that accompanied the ERA research exercise.

The E & I assessment was introduced in December 2015 by the federal government to examine how universities translate their research into economic, environmental, social, cultural and other benefits. Each Unit of Assessment (UoA) was considered, with Field of Research 19 ( Studies in Creative Arts and Writing) and 12 ( Built Environment and Design) of most relevance to creative arts researchers.

High – medium – low assessments were made in three areas:

  • Engagement: the extent to which university research engages with ‘end users’ outside academia

  • Impact:  the impact that university research has outside academia; and

  • Approach to impact: institutional approaches to facilitating the impacts.

FOR 19 Studies in Creative Arts and Writing E & I assessments

Institution Engagement Impact Approach to Impact
Bond University n/a n/a n/a
Charles Darwin University n/a n/a n/a
Charles Sturt University medium high medium
Central Queensland University n/a medium medium
Curtin University of
  Technology
high medium medium
Deakin University high high high
Edith Cowan University medium high high
Federation University
  Australia
n/a n/a n/a
Flinders University medium medium medium
Griffith University medium medium medium
James Cook University n/a n/a n/a
La Trobe University medium medium medium
Macquarie University medium medium high
Monash University medium medium medium
Murdoch University n/a n/a n/a
Queensland University of
  Technology
high high high
RMIT University high low medium
Southern Cross University n/a n/a n/a
Swinburne University of
  Technology
medium low low
The Australian National
  University
medium medium low
The University of Adelaide medium medium low
The University of Melbourne high high High
The University of New England n/a n/a n/a
The University of Newcastle high high High
The University of Notre Dame
  Australia
n/a n/a n/a
The University of Queensland medium medium Medium
The University of Sydney medium high High
The University of Western
  Australia
medium medium Low
University of Canberra medium high Medium
University of Divinity n/a n/a n/a
University of New South Wales high high High
University of South Australia n/a medium Low
University of Southern
  Queensland
n/a n/a n/a
University of Tasmania medium low Medium
University of Technology
  Sydney
n/a n/a n/a
University of the Sunshine
  Coast
n/a n/a n/a
University of Wollongong high high Medium
Victoria University n/a n/a n/a
Western Sydney University medium high High

FOR 12 Built Environment and Design E & I assessments

Institution Engagement Impact Approach to Impact
Australian Catholic University n/a n/a n/a
Bond University low n/a n/a
Charles Darwin University n/a n/a n/a
Charles Sturt University n/a n/a n/a
Central Queensland University n/a n/a n/a
Curtin University of
  Technology
high low medium
Deakin University medium medium high
Edith Cowan University n/a n/a n/a
Federation University
  Australia
n/a n/a n/a
Flinders University n/a n/a n/a
Griffith University high high high
James Cook University n/a n/a n/a
La Trobe University n/a n/a n/a
Macquarie University n/a n/a n/a
Monash University high high high
Murdoch University n/a n/a n/a
Queensland University of
  Technology
high medium high
RMIT University high high high
Southern Cross University n/a n/a n/a
Swinburne University of
  Technology
high high high
The Australian National
  University
n/a n/a n/a
The University of Adelaide high medium low
The University of Melbourne high high high
The University of New England n/a n/a n/a
The University of Newcastle medium medium medium
The University of Notre Dame
  Australia
n/a n/a n/a
The University of Queensland high high/medium high/low
The University of Sydney high high high
The University of Western
  Australia
medium high medium
University of Canberra n/a n/a n/a
University of Divinity n/a n/a n/a
University of New South Wales high high medium
University of South Australia high high medium
University of Southern
  Queensland
n/a n/a n/a
University of Tasmania high medium medium
University of Technology
  Sydney
high high high
University of the Sunshine
  Coast
n/a n/a n/a
University of Wollongong n/a n/a n/a
Victoria University n/a n/a n/a
Western Sydney University medium high high

Australian Centre for Contemporary Art search for new Exec Director

The Australian Centre for Contemporary Art is on the hunt for a new Executive Director to replace Linda Mickleborough who has stepped down after being in the role since 2016.

Acknowledging Linda’s contribution Max Delany, Artistic Director and CEO, said “Linda has made an outstanding contribution to ACCA’s strategic development. She leaves the organisation in a strong position and well-placed to advance our vision and goals for the benefit of artists and the wider community.”

Sydney Con announces new Associate Dean of Research

Professor Neal Peres Da Costa has been appointed as Associate Dean (Research) at Sydney Conservatorium of Music.

Professor Peres Da Costa joined the Sydney Conservatorium of Music in 2006 and founded the Early Music Unit (of which he was Chair from 2006-2016) now the Historical Performance Division and subsequently Program Leader of Postgraduate Research. He regularly performs with Australia’s leading ensembles including the Australian Chamber Orchestra, Sydney Symphony Orchestra, Pinchgut Opera, the Song Company, the Australian Haydn Ensemble, Bach Akademie Australia and Ironwood. Peres Da Costa has a distinguished discography and donates much of his spare time to students through his involvement in mentoring and by providing masterclasses for high school students and emerging artists

Sydney Conservatorium Director Professor Anna Reid said: “Neal is an amazing researcher and performer. He is world renowned for his work in historically informed practice, which includes experimental performance work alongside written representations of those works. We are looking forward to experiencing his musical influence as our Associate Dean (Research).”

The problematic nature of creative arts supervision: How well do we service our postgraduates?

There is no denying that creative arts in the university have been successful over recent decades. Yet Jen Webb still asks, in a July 2018 NiTRO piece, “Are we there yet?” - the ‘we’ being the collective staff and students of the creative and performing arts disciplines. I want to site this discussion at the ground level where creative arts postgraduates and supervisors interact.

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University management should take creative practice research seriously … before it’s too late

It was heartening to read QUT Vice-Chancellor, Margaret Sheil, write in support of the arts and humanities in the last edition of NiTRO. In it, she insisted that universities “must foster the creative arts and the human and social sciences, not only alongside the sciences but in concert with them”. It’s the human aspect that I want to pick up on here.

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Kit Wise takes RMIT interim Dean of Art role

DDCA Board member Professor Kit Wise will take up the role of interim Dean for the School of Arts for nine months as Professor Julian Goddard, also a DDCA Board member, moves to a college-wide role in RMIT’s Cultural Engagement scheme.

Pro Vice Chancellor Paul Gough acknowledged Professor Wise’s extensive experience in senior leadership roles over the last ten years at the University of Tasmania and Monash University - including as Director and Head of the School of Creative Arts and Interim Director of the Creative Exchange Institute at UTAS; and, Acting Head of Art and Associate Dean Education at Monash.

Professor Gough said “Kit has had a longstanding engagement with the creative industries of Melbourne through numerous professional engagements with individuals and institutions across Victoria; and through his gallery, Sarah Scout Presents. These have been extended through leadership roles on peak bodies, extensive national and international networks, and a range of interdisciplinary partnerships.”