Thirteenth International Conference on The Arts in Society

Conference dates: 27-29 June 2018
Conference location: Emily Carr University of Art + Design, Vancouver, Canada
Website: http://artsinsociety.com/2018-conference

The 13th International Conference on the Arts in Society features research addressing the following annual themes: Arts education, art theory and history, new media technology and the arts, and social and political agendas. The special focus of 2018 is How Art Makes Things Happen - Situating Social Practice in Research, Practice, and Action.

CHASS Australia Prize nominations open

The Council for Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (CHASS) is inviting nominations for its 2018 Australia Prizes. Two prizes are being sponsored by Routledge (cash prize of $3,500 each): One for a non-fiction book/e-book that enriches Australian cultural and intellectual life, the second for ‘Distinctive Work’- an exceptional artistic performance, exhibition, film, television show, play, composition or practical contribution to policy. The third prize (cash prize of $2,000) is being sponsored by Future Leaders for a ‘Future Leader’, an individual under 30 years of age who is demonstrating leadership skill and potential in HASS. CHASS is sponsoring the fourth prize (cash prize of $500) for a student essay, exhibition, performance or project in any HASS area.

Further details are available at: http://www.chass.org.au/2018-australia-prizes/

Heritage in the Limelight Interdisciplinary Conference

Event date: 4-6 September 2018
Event location: Australian National University, Canberra, ACT
Websitehttp://soad.cass.anu.edu.au/events/call-papers-performances-heritage-limelight-interdisciplinary-conference

From its development in the colonial period, to its echoes in today’s multimedia spaces, the magic lantern, along with its thousands of photographic and hand-painted slides, has had a pervasive and lasting impact on visual culture. Historians are just discovering its powerful presence in entertainment, education, science, religion, politics andadvertising. Galleries, libraries and archives are uncovering untouched caches of slides in their collections. And artists and performers are rekindling the ‘magic’ of the technology.

The Australian Research Council Project, ‘Heritage in the Limelight: the magic lantern in Australia and the world’ is organising this conference in partnership with the National Film and Sound Archive. It will feature keynotes from international researchers, as well as papers and performances from significant Australian scholars and artists.

Indigenous Languages and Arts Program open for applications

Applications are invited for the 2018-2019 Indigenous Languages and Art Grant program. The program, which supports projects that include indigenous communities in project planning design and delivery, and express indigenous cultures through language and art, closes on 14 May 2018. Lodgement information is available at: https://www.grants.gov.au/?event=public.GO.show&GOUUID=5A8B3822-0C7B-4208-B67BE53684950F67
 

ANU School of Art & Design Sir William Dobell Annual Lecture: Mona: The only certainty is change by Jane Clark, Senior Research Curator, Museum of Old and New Art

Event date: 5.30pm, 9 May 2018
Event location: Sir Roland Wilson Building, Australian National University, Canberra
Websitehttp://soad.cass.anu.edu.au/events/anu-school-art-design-sir-william-dobell-annual-lecture-0

Mona, the Museum of Old and New Art in Hobart, is the largest private museum in Australia, with a collection ranging from antiquities through Australian modernism to contemporary international art. Its owner is Tasmanian-born David Walsh, who, in sharing his collection with the public and through an ambitious exhibition and publication program, seeks to challenge conventional approaches to art, to received wisdom and to the intersections between culture and biology.

Mona is an experiment: questioning, unpredictable, and fun. When the museum opened in 2011, it was almost entirely subterranean, a structure you could hardly see until you were in it. There was one tunnel. All that has changed in 2018. The tunnels have multiplied, are longer, layered, turn corners; and are not yet finished. The underground interior has expanded and erupted, upward and outward, into the light.

Jane Clark, Senior Research Curator at Mona since 2007, has taken a lead role in the display, collection development, publications and content management team. From the early collecting days of this extraordinary museum to the latest exhibitions, she presents an overview of a ground-breaking (quite literally) visual art experience.

Engendering socially inclusive practices: Yet another reason why music and arts education are a critical component of the curriculum

In the contemporary climate, education contexts are becoming increasingly heterogeneous and multicultural spaces. This diversity presents teachers, students and communities with exciting opportunities, but also creates complex challenges to navigate and understand.

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Making Art Work: latest Throsby study released by Australia Council

In case you missed it, the Australia Council released the latest report in the series of analyses of artists and their working environment that have been produced by Macquarie economist David Throsby over the past 30 years. This latest report, Making Art Work: An Economic Study Of Professional Artists In Australia, produced by David Throsby and Katya Petetskaya, highlights changes in education and training, career progression and a whole host of other factors surrounding working artists in Australia, between 1988 and 2016. The report is available at: http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/research/making-art-work/

ERA engagement and impact assessment panel chair announced for creative arts and humanities

Hot on the heels of the announcement that UQ’s Professor Graeme Turner will chair the research evaluation committee for creative arts and humanities, the ARC has announced that University of Sydney Professor of Media and Communications Gerard Goggin will be panel chair for creative arts and humanities in the inaugural round of the engagement and impact assessment. 

Professor Goggin is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Humanities, Secretary General of the International Association of Media and Communication Research and President of the Australian and New Zealand Communication Association. His research focuses upon the social cultural and inclusion aspects of digital technology, the Internet, mobile media and communication. 

Source: http://www.arc.gov.au/news-media/media-releases/ei-2018-assessment-panel-chairs-announced

24th International Symposium on Electronic Art

Event date: 23-30 June, 2018
Event location: Durban University of Technology, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
Websitehttp://www.isea-international.org/isea2018/

The  International Symposium on Electronic Art (ISEA) is one of the world’s most prominent international arts and technology events, bringing together scholarly, artistic, and scientific domains in an interdisciplinary discussion and showcase of creative productions applying new technologies in art, interactivity, and electronic and digital media.

The ISEA2018 theme of Intersections positions creative technological innovation as an activist engagement into public space and public practice. Creative collaboration between artists, artisans, designers, technologists, entrepreneurs, engineers, scientists and inventors will take place in a context where survival is the most basic instigator for solutions. In such a scenario, technological developments follow and support these solutions. In addition, the role of the artist is essential in providing opportunities to build new and exciting interactions between people and place.